(Photo: SheKnows)
 

Eggs and Easter are virtually synonymous.  But what do you do when you have an egg allergy?  

 

We had been using plastic eggs to hide safe candy for years.  My food allergic son was thrilled with the hunt, but it just didn’t feel like Easter unless we were sitting around smelly bowls of colored vinegar dyeing eggs.  When he was at the height of his egg allergy, I finally asked our allergist if my son could participate in this fabulous Easter tradition.  He informed us that the shell of an egg is made almost entirely of calcium carbonate – the same material found in sea shells, chalk, and pearls – and NOT the egg protein that my son was so allergic to.   Which meant…. that he could safely handle eggs enough to dye them!  

 

My son still couldn’t eat the eggs themselves, but faced with a choice between jelly beans, peeps and a hard boiled egg…  it didn’t feel like he was missing out!

 
If you are avoiding artificial coloring, try some of these natural dye recipes from Better Homes and Gardens:

 

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